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    AGwolf2097

    The game has been in development much longer than just the last couple years, chances are the composers were working with the team quite a while ago to build a score for the game. I’m willing to bet the Watermelon team had most of the game’s theme, environments, characters, concepts, etc outlined long ago, it’s not a stretch to consider they brought Jredd and Groovemaster in at the time, too.

    whatever purpose the “Datenmeister” is supposed to serve must have been relatively integral for the final product that Watermelon Games was hoping to deliver; I don’t know whether they designed the chip from the ground up, or simply repurposed an existing chip. Watermelon said it was a manufacturing error, which is kind of out of their hands. It’s not fair to blame that on them, though I concede if they DID design a custom chip, we don’t (and may never) know whether it was their error in design before they commissioned production.

    This post on a French forum sheds at least little more light:
    http://www.gamopat-forum.com/t97691p900-topic-officiel-project-y-paprium#2779646
    Google Translated:
    Fonzie contacted me after a long moment of silence (as usual ^ ^). Visibly he really encountered problems with the embedded dSP in the cartridge, they were left on an ASIC solution but it was not stable, random communication .. a lot of problems. They had to go back to another solution (fpga) that work well a priori but which is also more expensive for the manufacture of the cartridge

    If you wish to dig deeper into some of the game’s history, you can skim the over-400 pages in this forum thread that dates back to 2012:
    http://www.sega-16.com/forum/showthread.php?22142-Project-Y-Official-Thread
    (also, post number 6533 on page 436 is where someone mentions the post on that French forum)

    And see Watermelon’s own small page about the game from three and a half years ago:
    http://www.magicalgamefactory.com/en/factory/project-y_2/

    All that aside, I threw down for the game whenever the opportunity first arose, and I’m not upset in the slightest. I have plenty of other things to do in my spare time than feverishly and impatiently wait for something by a small group of people, who aren’t professionals, likely aren’t working full-time, who have encountered issues likely outside the scope of their control. As it stands, warm weather is around the corner, and I’ll be in my garage or outside at nearly every opportunity between now and October, so I’m not gonna be playing any games anyway.

    I’ve also quickly become a fan of Trevin Hughes (Jredd)’s music over the past few years, so I’m absolutely more than willing to wait longer for the game to come out. He’s personable and down to earth any time he engages in conversations on Facebook, too. His music is great, and I’m sure it will be a big part of Paprium’s presentation.

    He did a track on the YM2017 cartridge from Catskull Electronics (I bought one):
    https://soundcloud.com/jredd/astro-blaster-ym2017-hardware-recording

    And he also did the music on a small demo rom that was released about 4 years ago:
    http://www.pouet.net/prod.php?which=62574
    My favorite track being Tiido Beat (apparently a request by Tiido, who is also part of Watermelon’s sound dev team, or at least was)

    On that note, Tiido is also a pretty cool dude. I’ve talked with him a bit years ago when I ordered a CCAM module from him and encountered some difficulty with it. He knows what he’s doing and is very skilled at pushing the Genesis’ hardware to its limits/.

    My experience interacting with at least these two people who happen to have relation to the project is another reason I’m happy to still wait. When I gave money through the kickstarter, it wasn’t just because I wanted a game, it was because I wanted to support the team of people who were trying to make it happen. They’re dedicated fans to the Genesis and its legacy as much as any of the rest of us, so I don’t think it’s fair to sow seeds of contempt just because the project hasn’t been a model of perfect game production. It’s also being built from scratch, not built off of pre-existing code, and being designed to run on 30 year old original hardware rather than a lot of other indie games that can look the part but simply run on a contemporary operating system.

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